Conference '1997-2017: 20 years after the Oviedo Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine'

Conference '1997-2017: 20 years after the Oviedo Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine: What are the achieved gains and its potential?'

  • 8-9 December 2017, European University Cyprus (Nicosia)

The Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine (commonly referred to as the Oviedo Convention) defines a general framework for the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms with regards to the applications of biology and medicine. It lays down a series of principles and prohibitions concerning bioethics, medical research, consent, rights to private life and information, organ transplantation, genetics, etc.

Since the opening of the Treaty in 1997, only 35 member-states of the Council of Europe have signed it, 29 of which having also ratified it. For the remaining member-states of the Council of Europe signature and ratification are still pending. During the decade 1998 and 2008 and under the provisions of article 31 of the Convention, 5 Additional Protocols have been drawn up to expand the range of its general principles. What has happened since? Has the Convention and its Protocols really strengthened individual rights in the healthcare setting?

20 years after the opening, academics and professionals from different perspectives (law, medicine, ethics, sociology, and economics) will meet, discussing the main and latest developments in Biomedicine during a two-day conference.

More information
Please see here the flyer with more detailed information about the conference.